Australia and china defence relationship goals

"The Australia-China Security Relationship: Enhancing Bilateral Coopera" by Connor Johnson

australia and china defence relationship goals

Cameron Stewart, 'Strategic Retreat on Defence Aims', The Australian, 21 December . You Ji, 'PLA Transformations and Australia-Chinese Military Relations'. Apr 13, To replicate all or part of this document for any purpose other than those the model of Australia's defence relationship with Indonesia. China as a global economic power and a regional military power; the re‐emergence of. objectives of promoting greater cooperation with India, it will need to move in a consistent to enhance its security and defence relationship with India, it must be .. India and Australia want to be in a position to signal to China that they have.

The Government is pursuing a number of initiatives to strengthen and diversify this relationship. The Agreement will enhance the growing trade and investment relationship between our highly complementary economies.

It will ensure the competitiveness of Australia's agricultural and manufacturing industries, protect and ensure the competitiveness of our services providers and attract greater investment in Australia. Australian services providers benefit from new access to China's significant and growing services sector.

The Government has been promoting its open investment regime and Foreign Investment Review Board process, which continues to attract Chinese investors. The majority of investment has been in resources but is now moving into agriculture, tourism and infrastructure.

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Increasing numbers of Australian businesses are entering the Chinese market with great success. However — like all cross border commercial activities — the benefits of doing business in China are coupled with considerable risks.

The ' Doing Business in China ' initiative continues to inform Australian companies about how to manage the risks and offers best-practice guidelines to dispute resolution. Chinese business visitors will benefit from the increased flexibility offered by a new three-year multiple entry visitor visa, which was announced by the Government in April Australia commenced a 10 year validity visitor visa trial for eligible applicants in China in late Australians are increasingly purchasing products from China through online shopping sites.

If you buy from an online seller based overseas, you should be aware that you may experience practical difficulties in obtaining a remedy from them. Each of these announcements should help support trade and investment and continue to enhance financial cooperation between our two countries. As soon as it was announced that the Buddhist leader and symbol of the Tibetan independence struggle would be visiting Australia, the Chinese Government began protesting against any suggestion that the Dalai Lama would meet the Prime Minister or any senior Australian Government figure.

When the Prime Minister said he would indeed meet the Dalai Lama, the People's Daily launched a particularly strident attack on the Australian government: The statement repeated the warning that the decision would 'unavoidably produce a negative impact on relations between China and Australia'. Nevertheless, senior members of previous Australian governments and parliament had held meetings with the Dalai Lama without the vituperation which marked their reaction to Mr Howard's meeting.

The Chinese have always opposed such meetings but their response on this occasion was at a new level. It is quite unusual for Australian foreign policy to be subject to a repeated critique in the Chinese press. The View from Beijing The change in the character of Chinese statements about Australia needs to be understood as the product of a general perception in Beijing that Australian policy was being redefined under a Coalition Government.

A number of individual actions without a united objective in mind were interpreted by the Chinese authorities as a co-ordinated policy response. The Australian Government did not appear to appreciate the extent to which Beijing would read a single coherent meaning into the actions.

The view from Beijing was that Australia under a Coalition Government was becoming less sympathetic to the Chinese position on highly sensitive issues such as Taiwan and Tibet and was moving to re-emphasise traditional especially US relationships at the expense of Asian connections.

Of particular disquiet from Beijing's point of view, Australia's renewed stress on the importance of the US alliance was seen as a return to a less independent foreign policy which would conform more closely to US interests.

This was regarded with particular concern at a time when China-US relations were being affected by a number of disagreements. Dealing with an Emerging Great Power Following the efforts of senior Australian Government officials and the meeting between the Australian Prime Minister and Chinese President in Manila in Novemberthe government of China brought an end to the hostile public critique of Australian policy.

A Chinese presidential spokesman was reported as describing the Howard-Ziang meeting as 'very friendly': One meeting cannot resolve all the problems, but the two leaders have reached a common understanding to overcome our difficulties and keep better relations in the future.

This is the beginning of another stage; that we should keep the momentum going.

australia and china defence relationship goals

His comments indicate that the Chinese Government has a generally positive attitude towards the prospects for Sino-Australian relations. Politically and militarily, China and Australia pose no threat to each other. Economically, the two countries complement each other. Furthermore, there are many opportunities for Australia and China to cooperate with each other in international and particularly regional issues.

He said the difficulties in were due to the Australian government taking 'some actions which ended up hurting the national feelings of the Chinese people'. As long as the two countries respect each other's sovereignty and territorial integrity, bilateral relations will continue to develop and the potential for cooperation between the two sides will be enhanced.

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Although Australia's relations with China have undergone a qualitative change during the last decade and are no longer framed in predominantly geopolitical terms, the Chinese leadership still conducts all its international affairs with broader regional and global implications in mind.

Containment, Engagement and Australia-China Relations Chinese perceptions of how it is regarded in international affairs are still strongly influenced by suspicions that the US and to some extent Japan and other Western powers harbour a desire to prevent China from taking its place amongst the major players on the world stage. Chinese officials look back on a history in which China saw itself as the 'Middle Kingdom' to which the rest of the world paid tribute, followed by a hundred years of humiliation and incursions into its sovereignty by foreigners.

When the Chinese people 'stood up', as Mao put it inand embarked on a new effort to rebuild their country, the US instituted a policy of 'containment' which the Chinese Government considered was an attempt to keep China weak and isolated.

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These crucial underlying factors in China's relations with the countries of the West became especially evident in the discord which affected US relations with China beginning from Relations deteriorated over a number of issues: US actions over Taiwan and strategic issues began to be read as signs of a return to the policies of 'containment'.

Beijing feared that while professing to seek 'constructive engagement' with China, the US actually wanted to contain the rise of a rival superpower. Australia is seen as a faithful long-term ally of the US which supported the US during the Vietnam War and the Cold War and emulated the US policy of recognising the Taiwan regime as the legitimate government of China. At the same time, Australia is appreciated for its capacity to act independently of the US, including trading with China during the s and s and recognising the PRC insix years before the US.

australia and china defence relationship goals

During the s, Australia's close relationship with China also played a small role in facilitating China's economic and political opening to the world in the post-Maoist era. Australia also expressed its disagreement with US efforts, in andto link China's MFN status with the issue of human rights. Nevertheless, the Chinese authorities remain highly sensitive to any perceived changes in Australia's strategic and economic outlook and are especially wary of any moves to return to what could be seen as a slavish emulation of the US.

While Australia and China have, since the s, developed a strong bilateral relationship based on shared interests, China still handles its affairs with individual countries in the context of global strategic relationships. As Australia's bilateral and regional involvement with China grows in the future, a key challenge for Australia's policy-makers will be to balance the demands of the relationship with China while maintaining close strategic and economic ties with the US.

One of the central dilemmas for both Australia and the US will continue to be the question of Taiwan. China under the current regime would never accept a formally independent Taiwan, but Taiwan has been effectively independent for many years and is becoming an increasingly important economic player in the region, lobbying with growing effectiveness for a more regularised status in the international community.

The contrast of Taiwan's transition to democratic rule with the authoritarianism and suppression of human rights in China has been instrumental in winning Taipei many supporters in the US, particularly in Congress. Any change in policy on Taiwan in either Washington or Canberra would jeopardise the even more important relationship with Beijing, yet the pressures on the current ambiguous arrangements can only grow in the future.

The issue of Hong Kong is not fraught with the complexities of Taiwan's status, but the territory's reunification with China in July has many potential problems, not only in terms of their implications for US-China relations but because of Australia's direct bilateral interests. Hong Kong is a very important trading partner for Australia whose economic future is of great interest for Australia, and Australia will be unable to stand aloof from the tensions which may develop over the issue of political freedom and human rights in the territory under Chinese rule.

China country brief - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Economic Growth and Political Uncertainty The growing importance of relations with China for Australian policy-makers is set to continue because China is maintaining rapid economic growth even while entering a period of political uncertainty. International attention has focused even more on this uncertainty since the death of Deng Xiaoping.

The Chinese economy has sustained an average annual growth rate of almost ten per cent over the last decade and is projected to become the world's second largest economy within the next ten years. China's growth, together with Australia's greater relative economic involvement in the Asia-Pacific region, have led to a twenty per cent average annual increase in Australia's exports to China over the last five years. China is currently Australia's fifth largest trading partner and if the trade figures with Hong Kong were to be added after reunification in Julythe total would rank third after Japan and the US.

Chinese investment in Australian agriculture and minerals has expanded considerably in recent years. China's economic success has boosted the confidence with which the Chinese Government is conducting its foreign relations and asserting its position in regional territorial disputes such as the Spratly Islands, 28 in its relations with powers such as the US and Japan and over issues such as human rights. While China's military capability is limited and its armed forces are only at the beginning of what will be a long process of modernisation, the country's rapid economic development provides the necessary conditions for its eventual rise to the status of a major military power.

The effective debunking of Maoist ideology following the rise to power of Deng Xiaoping has meant that the legitimacy of the Chinese Communist Party has come to rely on its capacity to deliver access to material wealth. But the benefits of the new approach have not flowed evenly to the Chinese people. In contrast with the shared backwardness of Maoist China, regional disparities are widening as well-situated provinces take advantage of new opportunities while poorer regions experience far less growth.

The rise of market-driven economics has uprooted millions of people in search of work and thrown the future of millions of workers in old state-owned industries into doubt.

With rising visible poverty and crime, many Chinese perceive that the benefits of economic growth are being monopolised by a corrupt minority. The suppression of the pro-democracy movement in Junewhich arose partly to protest against such problems, further weakened the legitimacy of the Communists and has led them to depend increasingly on the power of the armed forces. The Party continues to shrink from any ideas of political liberalisation for fear of the complete loss of control which brought about the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Meanwhile the continuous growth of the privately-owned economy and of foreign trade is steadily diminishing Beijing's control over the functioning of the economy and its capacity to exercise power over the daily lives of the Chinese people. Although Deng held no formal office fromhe was still a figure of immense authority until his death on 19 February His passing may exacerbate internal tensions and contest for power within the Party leadership.

His death will, at the very least, throw popular attention back onto the issue of the role of the Party. It was the spreading of a factional dispute within the Party into the streets in early which provided a catalyst for the mass movement which culminated in the events around Tiananmen Square in June While Deng's death is unlikely to provoke an immediate crisis, the future course of the process of political change in China could profoundly affect the character of Chinese foreign policy.

With the loss of Maoist ideology, the Party leadership has already increasingly emphasised its role as the defender of Chinese nationalism. As Michael Yahuda has argued, trends towards aggressive nationalism in foreign relations could be heightened if there is division or uncertainty during the process of succession: The less disruptive [the succession] may be, the more likely it is that a self-confident leadership will emerge that would be able to pursue China's sovereignty claims with moderation The more difficult the succession the more likely that a weak leadership would respond erratically and assertively to perceived challenges, especially if it were dependent upon the armed forces who are imbued with more virulent nationalist sentiments.

China is rapidly integrating into the world economy, but the state structures which made integration possible are slow to reform and adapt to the new Chinese society that economic change is creating. The Chinese Government understandably expects that the country's emerging status as a leading world economy should be given due recognition in global institutions and affairs, but some parts of the international community still consider that China does not conform fully to the established norms of international relations.

For its part, the Chinese Government, mindful of the fear and suspicion with which it is regarded in some quarters in the US, tends to interpret any pressure to reform its institutions and politics as a new form of anti-Chinese containment. Moreover, any policy or action by a foreign power which suggests a questioning of Chinese sovereignty over Tibet, Hong Kong or Taiwan is regarded as an act hostile to the interests of the entire Chinese nation.

These issues are fundamental to the background against which Australia must conduct its relations with China. As a key element in Australia's economic and strategic environment, China will occupy an increasingly central part of discussion about Australia's foreign relations in the future.

The experience of the last year of Australia-China relations was an excellent indicator of the kind of issues which must be dealt with in order to maintain a stable relationship.

The issues of the status of Taiwan and Australia's dealings with the Taipei government, human rights and the treatment of the Tibetan people, the conduct of aid and economic relations, and Australia's alliance with the US are all matters of great sensitivity for Australia-China relations. The pull Australia feels between China and the U.

In the document, the Australian government identifies the U. Located in the Southern Hemisphere, the country is on the periphery of major maritime trade routes. It has always relied on outside powers for this — both to secure sea routes and to spur economic activity through trade. It is here that U. The conflicting statements from Australian officials reflects this uneasiness about needing to work closely yet separately with two countries that are increasingly distrustful of one another.

The question over which side Australia should align itself with has been simmering for a couple of years.

Turnbull and other political leaders have gradually become more hawkish in their position against Chinese influence in Australia, particularly after reports of Chinese money being used to sway Australian political campaigns and policy. There has also been a clampdown on Chinese investments in Australian real estate, ports and farmland. In the past year, the administration of U.

President Donald Trump has cast doubt on the U. After mere days in office, Trump threatened to renege on a deal the U.